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Fundraising

Donations

FXNZ is a not for profit organisation and receives no money from the government. It is run completely on grants, donations, philanthropic support and sponsorship. Donations can be made directly to the FXNZ account ASB 123152 0096420 00 or via our Givealittle page.

Payroll Giving

What’s it all about?

Payroll giving took effect in New Zealand from the 7th January 2010. The scheme provides a tax credit when an employee makes a gift of money to a donee organisation such as a school or charity, thus eliminating the need to collect and keep tax receipts to make a later claim.

The advantages

  1. For the registered charitable organisation: Payroll giving is an efficient, low-cost way for a charitable organisation to raise funds and receive regular income support.
  2. For the employee who donates: Employees who take part in payroll giving receive an immediate tax credit for their payroll donation reflected in their PAYE. The employer is responsible for passing the correct PAYE amount to Inland Revenue and advising IRD of the amount of the tax credits for payroll donation.

People donating through payroll giving don’t need to retain receipts and wait to file an annual claim form to get their donation tax credit. Payroll giving means the donation and the 33.33 percent credit happen immediately.

Example

An employee makes a payroll giving payment of $10.00 to a charity registered with the IRD.

The employer pays $10.00 to the charity but takes only $6.67 from the employee’s pay.

IRD reimburses the employer the remaining $3.33.

Note

  1. For payroll giving, a charity must be registered with IRD as a donee organisation. Fragile X New Zealand is on this register. See the list of registered donee organisations at the IRD website.
  2. Payroll giving is limited to employers filing PAYE returns online.

See also the payroll giving section of the IRD website.

For a form with our bank details to give to employers, see Payroll giving form for employers.

For a general information sheet on fragile X, see What is fragile X syndrome.